Endpoint Security

Endpoint security is the practice of protecting enterprise networks against threats originating from on-premises or remote devices. An endpoint is any device that provides an entry point to corporate assets and applications and represents a potential cybersecurity vulnerability. Examples include desktops, laptops, servers, workstations, smartphones and tablets.

Network Security

Network security is the protection of the underlying networking infrastructure from unauthorized access, misuse, or theft. It involves creating a secure infrastructure for devices, applications, users, and applications to work in a secure manner.

Application Security

Any software you use to run your business needs to be protected, whether your IT staff builds it or whether you buy it. Unfortunately, any application may contain holes, or vulnerabilities, that attackers can use to infiltrate your network. Application security encompasses the hardware, software, and processes you use to close those holes.

Cloud Security

Cloud security is a broad set of technologies, policies, and applications applied to defend online IP, services, applications, and other imperative data. It helps you better manage your security by shielding users against threats anywhere they access the internet and securing your data and applications in the cloud.

Security information and event management (SIEM)

SIEM products pull together the information that your security staff needs to identify and respond to threats. These products come in various forms, including physical and virtual appliances and server software.

Security Orchestration, Automation and Response (SOAR)

SOAR refers to technologies that enable organizations to collect inputs monitored by the security operations team. For example, alerts from the SIEM system and other security technologies — where incident analysis and triage can be performed by leveraging a combination of human and machine power — help define, prioritize and drive standardized incident response activities. SOAR tools allow an organization to define incident analysis and response procedures in a digital workflow format.

Threat Intelligence (TI)

Threat intelligence—also called ‘cyber threat intelligence’ (CTI) or ‘threat intel’—is data containing detailed knowledge about the cybersecurity threats targeting an organization. Threat intelligence helps security teams be more proactive, enabling them to take effective, data-driven actions to prevent cyber attacks before they occur. It can also help an organization better detect and respond to attacks in progress.